Category Archives: Parkinsons

273. Well, since you ask me for a tale of obsessive behaviour…

“There’s a woman who comes to all ‘The Bridge’ related events dressed as Saga – leather trousers and everything.  She even has the same car!” (Sofia Helin)

Now, I adore Detective Saga Noren  as much as the next person and would love her to end the series living happily with Henrik and his ghost children – though I’m not holding my breath. But there’s fandom and then there’s weird.  Reading interviews and blogs is OK; dressing in leather trousers and following the actor who plays her, borders on the obsessive.

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268: I’m a lumbarback and still OK….

Back bruised … probably more comfortable without the dressing… 

But I waved aside the lumbar puncture FAQs … this is my third, after all … and now I can’t remember how long you need to keep on the dressing.  

It’s probably not very long. I’ve already ripped off the dressings from my arms; bruising up nicely, I see. The back’s just a puncture wound, like my arms, isn’t it? So I probably could take off the dressing now; almost certainly could take off the dressing now.   

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262. A Jelly Miscellany…

It’s been how long?  A month?  Surely not…  Oh dear.  Let’s catch up then.

Back from our travels and plunged into getting the living room decorated ready for CarpetMan to do his stuff last Monday.  We’ve been working on this since the spring but with a week to the deadline, still had the fireplace to tile.

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236. Humankind cannot bear very much reality…

“At the age of twenty seven, copper-haired Maggie Hope had already foiled a plot to assassinate Churchill and blow up St Paul’s, saved Princess Elizabeth from being kidnapped, rescued a captured pilot from Berlin, taught at a school for Special Agents in Scotland and prevented First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt from being implicated in a lesbian murder scandal which would surely have led to America refusing to join in the War.”

I think it’s the gritty realism of the Maggie Hope novels that most appeals to me.

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235. Travelling light

This time, we said, we are definitely going to take Considerably Smaller Suitcases.

Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve been planning our second Grand Tour.  Autumn come she will and we’ll be hopping on and off trains with gay abandon, clutching our trusty Interrail Passes and Considerably Smaller Suitcases.

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234. Shake well before use…

What with Manchester and London Bridge and elections, I’ve been tiptoeing around social media of late, in an attempt to avoid the slabs of pure venom which are scattered amid the good stuff.  So, it was only this morning that I hit upon a post sharing the shattering news that one of my heroes – Tom Isaacs, president and co-founder of the Cure Parkinson’s Trust – died last week.  His passing was, apparently, “unexpected and swift”.  He was just forty nine.

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233. I’ve a lumbar-back and I’m OK…

“Now, I have to tell you about the possible complications,” says the Good Doctor.  “These are incredibly rare: I’ve done many, many lumbar punctures and no-one has ever had a problem but, legally, I still need to tell you.”

“Can I say that I’d rather not know?” I ask.

“I’m afraid not,” the Good Doctor tells me.

Damn.

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226. Sex and drugs and rock and roll…

“I was taking Entacapone … and it powered up hypersexuality.   It was replaced with Tolcapone which fixed the job.  I was pleased as I was nearly 60 and really could not be bothered.” (Person on PUK Forum)

Way Back When, I was lucky enough to have the chance to talk with BTMan: the first person I’d met with Parkinson’s who was neither mad nor dead nor both.  Those of you who have studied my juvenilia might remember him explaining that some Parkinson’s medications cause, as an unfortunate side-effect, a reduction in impulse control.  This can lead to excessive spending or gambling; or to over-eating; or to a greatly increased sex-drive, even in term-time.

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220. Seeing the Groundhog’s shadow…

“It’s one thing joining a gym – it’s another actually going.”  She was a wise bird, our old GP: retired now, alas.  Of my pregnancy with the InfantPhenomenon, she said: “a summer baby, how lovely! You’ll be able to sit in pub gardens.” Not my first thought but she had four children so knew whereof she spake.

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215. Bearable realities…

We are discussing a comprehension paper on ‘Discoveries’, Class Six and I.  One of the Gentleman Scientists discussed (and they are all gentleman, alas) was Alexander Graham Bell.  I happen to know everything about the telephone, having read a couple of paragraphs on the subject once in a Bill Bryson book.  So I share with the class my favourite fact, namely that, until Alexander’s friend Mr Watson invented the telephone bell some years later, the only way to know if someone was telephoning you was to pick up the receiver and check if they were on the other end.

One of the lassies frowns and raises her hand.  “Even if it didn’t ring, you’d know someone was calling because the phone would vibrate,” she suggests.   There is general agreement, swiftly followed by mild astonishment when I explained that the original phone neither rung nor vibrated.  I didn’t break it to them that it didn’t take photos either: humankind cannot bear very much reality.

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