Tag Archives: Parkinson’s

235. Travelling light

This time, we said, we are definitely going to take Considerably Smaller Suitcases.

Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve been planning our second Grand Tour.  Autumn come she will and we’ll be hopping on and off trains with gay abandon, clutching our trusty Interrail Passes and Considerably Smaller Suitcases.

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233. I’ve a lumbar-back and I’m OK…

“Now, I have to tell you about the possible complications,” says the Good Doctor.  “These are incredibly rare: I’ve done many, many lumbar punctures and no-one has ever had a problem but, legally, I still need to tell you.”

“Can I say that I’d rather not know?” I ask.

“I’m afraid not,” the Good Doctor tells me.

Damn.

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229. The photographers will snap us…

“Now, we need to make sure that all the points have contact with your skull.  If you look at the screen, you’ll see that most points are showing red at the moment.”

I look at the screen and indeed, on the diagram which represents my skull, there are many, many red spots – a positive plague of red spots.

“Now, when the points have sufficient contact, they go green.  So I’m going to manipulate the points until they have contact.  It is not painful – a bit like having your head massaged.”  And off he goes.

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226. Sex and drugs and rock and roll…

“I was taking Entacapone … and it powered up hypersexuality.   It was replaced with Tolcapone which fixed the job.  I was pleased as I was nearly 60 and really could not be bothered.” (Person on PUK Forum)

Way Back When, I was lucky enough to have the chance to talk with BTMan: the first person I’d met with Parkinson’s who was neither mad nor dead nor both.  Those of you who have studied my juvenilia might remember him explaining that some Parkinson’s medications cause, as an unfortunate side-effect, a reduction in impulse control.  This can lead to excessive spending or gambling; or to over-eating; or to a greatly increased sex-drive, even in term-time.

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221. With his head tucked underneath his arm…

“It’s Mrs Jellywoman, isn’t it?”

I am at the gym (thanks for all the helpful hints – so far, so good), face to face with a jolly woman, probably in her mid-sixties.  Though she might be ninety-eight but really, really benefiting from regular work-outs.  She does look familiar but I can’t quite place her.  I’m vaguely thinking Jacob’s nan; Jacob, whose suggestion for a word containing the ‘ee’ sound was “weed – like what you smoke.”  Maybe, maybe not…

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220. Seeing the Groundhog’s shadow…

“It’s one thing joining a gym – it’s another actually going.”  She was a wise bird, our old GP: retired now, alas.  Of my pregnancy with the InfantPhenomenon, she said: “a summer baby, how lovely! You’ll be able to sit in pub gardens.” Not my first thought but she had four children so knew whereof she spake.

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219. Survival of the wobbliest?

“If you wouldn’t mind filling in these while I prepare the injection – sorry, I know there’s some duplication, but that’s the NHS for you.”

We have the world’s loveliest pharmacist.  He’s a great listener, great professional and bedrock for the community.  When I walked into his shop for my first lot of Parkinson’s meds and promptly burst into tears, he was kindness personified.  Plus he listens to Radio Four and can converse intelligently about The Archers.  So I will fill in any amount of forms while he prepares my flu jab.

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217.When troubles come…

Life can turn on a sixpence.

Ann from next door and I were chatting yesterday whilst sweeping leaves off the pavement.  Ann has an uncle – we’ll call him Pat – in his mid-nineties.  He’s been married for forty-seven years to his second wife.  Let’s call her Jess.  She’s about ten years younger than Uncle Pat, so mid-eighties.  There are two sons, both abroad.

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215. Bearable realities…

We are discussing a comprehension paper on ‘Discoveries’, Class Six and I.  One of the Gentleman Scientists discussed (and they are all gentleman, alas) was Alexander Graham Bell.  I happen to know everything about the telephone, having read a couple of paragraphs on the subject once in a Bill Bryson book.  So I share with the class my favourite fact, namely that, until Alexander’s friend Mr Watson invented the telephone bell some years later, the only way to know if someone was telephoning you was to pick up the receiver and check if they were on the other end.

One of the lassies frowns and raises her hand.  “Even if it didn’t ring, you’d know someone was calling because the phone would vibrate,” she suggests.   There is general agreement, swiftly followed by mild astonishment when I explained that the original phone neither rung nor vibrated.  I didn’t break it to them that it didn’t take photos either: humankind cannot bear very much reality.

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196. Silence in court…

Snazzy plain blue Mao-style disposable trouser suit on – check.

Cannula thing in left wrist artery for radioactive tracer and splint applied to keep it firmly in position – check.

Thing in vein of right arm for regular taking of blood throughout and tape applied to keep that firmly in position – check.

All paperwork signed; permission given; off to the PET scanner we go, in search of possible brain inflammation.  All in the cause of Parkinson’s research.

I clamber clumsily onto the scanner trolley, which is darned tricky on account of not being able to bend either arm.  How the Plarchers manage to do all the farming and stuff with non-bendable arms, goodness knows!

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