Category Archives: tremor

256. Day 15: You put your suitcase in, your suitcase out…

Copenhagen to Lübeck: four hours.  We’d reserved window seats to enjoy the scenery.  On the map, it looks as if we’re going quite close to the coast and at one point will need to cross what ActorLaddie tells me is the Baltic Sea.  I’m intrigued how this is going to work: on the way to Copenhagen, we crossed some pretty spectacular bridges and also went through some fairly long tunnels.  I wonder if it’ll be a combination of these or whether we’re going to all be asked to swim across dragging the train behind us.  I hope it’s not the latter as it’s raining and I’d rather not get wet.

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226. Sex and drugs and rock and roll…

“I was taking Entacapone … and it powered up hypersexuality.   It was replaced with Tolcapone which fixed the job.  I was pleased as I was nearly 60 and really could not be bothered.” (Person on PUK Forum)

Way Back When, I was lucky enough to have the chance to talk with BTMan: the first person I’d met with Parkinson’s who was neither mad nor dead nor both.  Those of you who have studied my juvenilia might remember him explaining that some Parkinson’s medications cause, as an unfortunate side-effect, a reduction in impulse control.  This can lead to excessive spending or gambling; or to over-eating; or to a greatly increased sex-drive, even in term-time.

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222. What’s that you say?

“But you’ve been selling me a National Express ticket to Birmingham every weekend for months!  Why not now?”

Mrs Travel-Centre  is of a certain age and traditional build.  Well, that’s not exactly how YoungLochinvar later describes her, but then he was speaking with the brutality of youth:  a youth, moreover, already cutting it fine to get his coach to Birmingham.

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220. Seeing the Groundhog’s shadow…

“It’s one thing joining a gym – it’s another actually going.”  She was a wise bird, our old GP: retired now, alas.  Of my pregnancy with the InfantPhenomenon, she said: “a summer baby, how lovely! You’ll be able to sit in pub gardens.” Not my first thought but she had four children so knew whereof she spake.

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219. Survival of the wobbliest?

“If you wouldn’t mind filling in these while I prepare the injection – sorry, I know there’s some duplication, but that’s the NHS for you.”

We have the world’s loveliest pharmacist.  He’s a great listener, great professional and bedrock for the community.  When I walked into his shop for my first lot of Parkinson’s meds and promptly burst into tears, he was kindness personified.  Plus he listens to Radio Four and can converse intelligently about The Archers.  So I will fill in any amount of forms while he prepares my flu jab.

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218. It’s now or never…

I wasn’t put to the piano as a child.  Refused the offer of lessons, apparently: as good a reason as any to invent time travel.  But I’d really like to be able to play and, to quote Bro-In-Law – a man of infinite resource and sagacity – when someone asked him why he’d just taken up learning Gypsy  Jazz Guitar, “I decided not to wait until I was younger.”

I did sort of start learning about twenty years ago but, what with teaching full-time and having two children, practice never seemed to reach the top of the To-Do list.  So the enterprise was shelved, pending retirement.  Which is Now.

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215. Bearable realities…

We are discussing a comprehension paper on ‘Discoveries’, Class Six and I.  One of the Gentleman Scientists discussed (and they are all gentleman, alas) was Alexander Graham Bell.  I happen to know everything about the telephone, having read a couple of paragraphs on the subject once in a Bill Bryson book.  So I share with the class my favourite fact, namely that, until Alexander’s friend Mr Watson invented the telephone bell some years later, the only way to know if someone was telephoning you was to pick up the receiver and check if they were on the other end.

One of the lassies frowns and raises her hand.  “Even if it didn’t ring, you’d know someone was calling because the phone would vibrate,” she suggests.   There is general agreement, swiftly followed by mild astonishment when I explained that the original phone neither rung nor vibrated.  I didn’t break it to them that it didn’t take photos either: humankind cannot bear very much reality.

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192. Overture and beginners please…

Jim next door has Parkinson’s.  They’ve suspected it for a while, Jim and Ann, and given his symptoms – asymmetrical pill-rolling style tremor; writing gone very small – I suspected it too.  But they had to wait ages to see a neurologist and finally got confirmation last week.

Ann came round to tell me and asked how long it was since I’d been diagnosed.  Just over four years, I told her, and tried to look jolly and bouncing with health.  Which, actually, I am.  Pretty much.

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182. You’ve got to carry that weight…

“So I called the boys into my office and we had a very stern conversation about swearing in the playground … the need for the oldest children in the school to act as good role models … the consequences should this behaviour recur. Then I sent them off to apologise to the dinner ladies.

“I watched them walk down the corridor and, as they turned the corner, Yob 1 turned to Yob 2 and, um, did this …”

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181. Extraordinary how potent cheap music is…

“We’d been calling all afternoon,” said Douglas’s daughter. “We were about to have one last try when he rang us. Apparently he’d been out with some neighbours. They’d gone, Dad told us, to ‘sing to the old people’.” (Douglas was nearly ninety four.)  “I do hope he mimed. Even the old people don’t deserve Dad’s singing.”

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